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"Friday Night Lights" Movie Sequel or Series Return?

"Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose"

For those of you who are not familiar with the sports drama franchise, allow me to introduce it to you in a few short sentences. The Friday Night Lights-universe centers around football (American) and the lives of small Texas town high school students.

Image via Live for Films.
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Everything started with a film in 2004, starring Billy Bob Thornton. Friday Night Lights, the movie, became an instant success and is now considered as one of the best in the genre. The story followed Coach Gary Gaines as he tried to revive the Permian Panthers from Odessa, Texas, and get them to win state in 1988.
Synopsis: Odessa, Texas, is a small, town in Texas. Racially divided and economically dying, there is one night that gives the town something to live for: Friday Night. The Permian Panthers have a big winning tradition in Texas high school football, led by QB Mike Winchell and superstar tailback Boobie Miles, but all is not well, as Boobie suffers a career-ending injury in the first game of the season. Hope is lost among citizens in Odessa, and for the team, but Coach Gary Gaines, who believes that "Perfection is being able to look your friends in the eye and know you did everything you could not to let them down", is somehow able to help the team rise up from the ashes and make a huge season comeback. Now on their way to state, the Panthers must go out and be perfect, because they may never matter this much for the rest of their lives.
Top 15 American Football Movies
Starring: Billy Bob Thornton, Lucas Black, Garrett Hedlund, Derek Luke, Tim McGraw, Connie Britton, Amber Heard and others.
Trivia: The movie is based on the book Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream by H.G. Bissinger and depicts true events.

Image via Aceshowbiz.
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Two years later, the movie inspired a TV series spin-off. Bearing the same title, the show introduced Coach Eric Taylor and the Dillon Panthers from small town Dillon, Texas. The story is very similar - one could say almost identical - to the film. However, the series focuses deeper on the lives of the players. The show ran for five seasons, between 2006-2011.
Synopsis: In the small town of Dillon, Texas, one night matters: Friday Night. Eric Taylor has recently been hired as the head football coach for the Dillon High School Panthers, the town's pride and joy. Friday Night Lights displays the stress that the town gives the high school players to win, and the hope that the team gives to a small town, and how a team has its low points, its high points, and how they come together as a team on their way to victory.
QUIZ: Friday Night Lights series return or film sequel? (below) 
Starring: Kyle Chandler, Connie Britton, Taylor Kitsch, Aimee Teegarden, Zach Gilford, Jesse Plemons, Minka Kelly, Adrianne Palicki and others.
There has been talk about a series return and a movie sequel. However, the stars of the show Kyle Chandler and Connie Britton disagree on the former matter. But what do you think?

Do you want to see another Friday Night Lights movie or a series return? If the franchise is continued, should it be with the original stars? Do you think it would be better to focus on College or Professional football in a state, other than Texas? I want to hear your ideas.

QUIZ

<a href="http://www.sodahead.com/entertainment/do-you-want-to-see-another-friday-night-lights-movie-or-a-series-return/question-3788726/" title="Do you want to see another "Friday Night Lights" MOVIE or a SERIES return?">Do you want to see another "Friday Night Lights" MOVIE or a SERIES return?</a>

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Jonathan Demme, Oscar-Winning Director, Dies at 73

By Brent Lang, Carmel Dagan
Oscar-winning director Jonathan Demme died Wednesday in New York of cancer complications, his publicist told Variety. He was 73 years old.

Demme is best known for directing “The Silence of the Lambs,” the 1991 horror-thriller that was a box office smash, a critical triumph, and introduced moviegoers to Anthony Hopkins’ Hannibal Lecter, a charismatic serial with a yen for chianti, fava beans, and cannibalism. The story of a novice FBI analyst (Jodie Foster) on the trail of a murderer became only the third film in history to win Academy Awards in all the top five categories ( picture, actor, actress, director, and adapted screenplay), joining the ranks of “It Happened One Night” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.”

Though he had his greatest success terrifying audiences, most of Demme’s work was looser and quirkier. In particular, he showed a great humanism and an empathy for outsiders in the likes of “Melvin and Howard,” the story of a service station owner who claimed to have been a beneficiary of Howard Hughes, and “Something Wild,” a screwball comedy about a banker whose life is turned upside down by a kooky woman. He also scored with “Married to the Mob” and oversaw “Stop Making Sense,” a documentary about the Talking Heads that is considered to be a seminal concert film.

Following “The Silence of the Lambs,” Demme used his clout to make “Philadelphia,” one of the first major studio films to tackle the AIDS crisis and a movie that won Tom Hanks his first Oscar for playing a gay lawyer.
The director most recently worked on an episode of the Fox police drama “Shots Fired,” which is scheduled to air on April 26 — the same day Demme’s death was announced. He also filmed the 2016 concert film “Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids.” His most recent narrative feature was 2015’s “Ricki and the Flash,” starring Meryl Streep as an aging rocker who must return home to Indiana due to a family crisis. The film disappointed at the box office and reviews were muted.

After jumping on the CB radio craze with the under-appreciated indie “Handle With Care,” Demme came to the attention of Hollywood with the 1980 film “Melvin and Howard.” Both films starred Paul LeMat; Jason Robards co-starred as a bearded, bedraggled Hughes encountered by struggling Melvin Dumont, who helps Howard out — only to be left $156 million in a Hughes will of dubious authenticity. The film worked because it was not about Hughes but about Dumont, played by Paul Le Mat (one of Demme’s favorite actors). It drew three Oscar nominations, winning for best supporting actress (Mary Steenburgen) and original screenplay (Bo Goldman), while Robards also drew a nomination.

The 1984 film “Swing Shift,” a romantic dramedy set on the homefront during WWII and starring Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell, was directed by Demme but taken out of his hands by the studio and recut, reportedly to make Hawn’s characterization more flattering. Director and star clashed during the production with Hawn wanting a more conventional love story with laughs and Demme preferring something with rougher edges.

Two years later, Demme rebounded with the New Wave-flavored indie comedy “Something Wild.” He drew an erotically anarchical performance from Melanie Griffith, as a brunette on the run, and coaxed an impressive debut from Ray Liotta as Griffith’s lunatic ex-boyfriend.

Demme had a way with actors, discovering new talent and allowing performers to stretch their muscles. His 1988 comedy “Married to the Mob,” starred Michelle Pfeiffer, replete with loud hair and a thick New York accent, in a performance that showed the actress’ range.  It also benefited from excellent supporting performances by Dean Stockwell as the Mafia boss and Mercedes Ruehl as his far fiercer wife. Stockwell earned an Oscar nomination.

In addition to “Stop Making Sense,” Demme did documentaries on the Pretenders, Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young, and he also directed quite a number of music videos, drawing a Grammy nomination in 1987 for best long form music video for “Sun City: Artists United Against Apartheid.”
Demme’s nonfiction work also dipped into politics and social issues, profiling the likes of Jimmy Carter and Nelson Mandela.  He made two documentaries about Haiti, 1988’s “Haiti Dreams of Democracy” and 2003’s critically acclaimed “The Agronomist.” Of the latter the New York Times said, “The turbulence that led to the removal of Jean-Bertrand Aristide from Haiti’s presidency gives ‘The Agronomist,’ a superb new documentary by Jonathan Demme, a melancholy timeliness. Its hero, Jean Dominique, embodies the fragile, perpetual hope that Haiti might someday nurture a just and decent political order.”

Demme’s commercial prowess waned in the late 1990s and early aughts. “Beloved,” a 1998 adaptation of Toni Morrison’s award-winning book, received some critical support, but was a massive bomb and failed to attract much Oscar attention. Then there was an ill-advised 2002 “Charade” remake “The Truth About Charlie,” which starred Mark Wahlberg and Thandie Newton and proved a disservice to the classic Stanley Donen original.

He also failed to convince critics that his 2004’s big-budget, high-profile remake of “The Manchurian Candidate” needed to be made. The film starred Denzel Washington, Liev Schreiber and Meryl Streep, which hit in the middle of a contentious presidential election between George W. Bush and John Kerry, but despite the political climate, it didn’t make much of a splash.

The 2008 film “Rachel Getting Married,” was a return to form for Demme, and served as an excellent vehicle for Anne Hathaway to demonstrate acting ability in a largely unsympathetic role of a young woman, out of rehab long enough to attend the wedding of the sister. Hathaway received her first Oscar nomination for the part.

Demme directed an adaptation of the Ibsen play “The Master Builder,” penned by and starring Wallace Shawn, in 2013. In 2015, in addition to “Ricki and the Flash,” he directed the docu-series “The New Yorker Presents,” bringing to life the iconic magazine.

Robert Jonathan Demme was born in Baldwin, Long Island, New York, and attended the University of Florida. Like John Sayles, he began his directing career in Roger Corman’s stable, helming women’s prison exploitation film “Caged Heat” in 1974; nostalgic road trip film “Crazy Mama,” starring Cloris Leachman, in 1975; and Peter Fonda action film “Fighting Mad” in 1976.

In 2006 Demme was presented with the National Board of Review’s Billy Wilder Award. Demme’s nephew, director Ted Demme, died in 2002 at age 38.

Demme was previously married to director-producer Evelyn Purcell. He is survived by second wife Joanne Howard and their three children: Ramona, Brooklyn and Jos.

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